Archives for posts with tag: sculpture

Niki de Saint PhalleBorn at Neuilly-sur-Seine in 1930, the painter and sculptor Niki de Saint Phalle grew up in New York. At 18 she eloped with writer and childhood friend Harry Matthews, and they had two children together. Niki didn’t fit the domesticated wife mould, and after a nervous breakdown she started painting as therapy. In 1960 Niki left her husband and children to devote herself to her art. She lived with sculptor Jean Tinguely, and became a member of the Paris group of artists the ‘Nouveaux Réalistes’.
shooting_painting
In their group exhibition Niki presented her “shooting” paintings for the first time. She filled polythene bags with paint and enclosed them within plaster on a board backing. She, or spectators, then shot at the painting, releasing the paint in random explosions of colour.
I Shot Against
From 1964 came her monumental goddess sculptures, the Nanas (‘nana’ is French for ‘chick’). The buxom, colorful female figures, inspired by a friend’s pregnancy, and first made of yarn, paper-maché and wire and later made of polyester, represent happy, freed women and harbingers of a new matriarchic age.
She_a_cathedral_1966
Read the rest of this entry »

IMG_0171
I sometimes work at an office in Bourke Street, and have often noticed this angel sculpture, high on a wall next door to an office building at 160 Queen Street, Melbourne.

I finally decided to photograph it recently. Unfortunately I couldn’t find out any information about the sculptor, and there wasn’t a plaque at the site (that I could find), but it is quite beautiful. The figure looks futurist to me, stylised and holding a wheel. If anyone knows more about it please contact me…

... standing on a surfboard?

I recently visited Lavandula lavender farm. It’s incredibly beautiful and there was a sculpture show on as a bonus. Sculptures from 25 artists, including Zoe Amor, Paul Turbitt, and Kaya Storm dotted the gardens.

My favourite sculpture in the show was by Peter Laszlo.

The soul is like a sail

This work was inspired by the Revelation of Ares.
In this book the Creator asks Humanity to change towards the Good.
The book explains that man is not born with a soul but has to create
one for himself. This can only be achieved by following the virtuous way
of life. One does to need to believe in any religion or dogma, simply
to love other human beings and respect all living things…
Once the soul has been created by a virtuous loving, giving and forgiving life it will glide along the sea of spiritual eternity.

The soul is a sail, Peter Lazlo

I researched Louise Bourgeois for an assignment a while back, but I didn’t particularly like her work. But when I recently saw her work in the flesh at Heide Museum of Modern Art, I was impressed and moved.

Her large sculpture Spider (1997) – a huge metal spider enclosing a cage containing a chair, pieces of tapestry, an old fashioned perfume bottle, darning needles and hatpins, small bones, and a cameo, which seemed like personal objects from her past – lurked in the gloom, resonating with psychological unease. The more I looked at it, the more details I noticed. It’s like a strange museum exhibit of Bourgeois’s traumatic childhood.
Louise Bourgeois, Spider, 1997

Every day you have to abandon your past or accept it, and then, if you cannot accept it, you become a sculptor. L. Bourgeois

The headless and partially limbless torsos, made of bandages, fabric and wood, one with a knife instead of a head, and the headless, deformed couple apparently having sex, were a disturbing embodiment of dysfunction, desire, fear and sexuality. I also found the black female figure hanging upside down like a carcass quite confronting.
L_Bourgeois_Knife_figure
L_Bourgeois_Couple-IV

Blue Days (1996) – a collection of Bourgeois’ dresses and shirts, on stuffed headless torsos like dressmakers forms, hanging on hooks on metal rods – felt merely nostalgic and ‘lighter’ than some of the other work. A welcome respite from the psychological darkness.
L_Bourgeois_Blue_Days

Cinq is five stuffed fabric heads hanging from the same hook. It was suggested that they might represent Bourgeois’s family. I liked the simplicity and tenderness of this work.
L_Bourgeois_Cinq

There was also a collection of lithographs of drawings and text. I liked the phrase ‘To unravel a torment you must begin somewhere’. The word unravel continues the sewing metaphor which pervades the work.

When I was growing up all the women in my house were using needles. I’ve always had a fascination with…the magic power of the needle. The needle is used to repair the damage.
L. Bourgeois, 1992

In a way I suppose Bourgeois was repairing the damage of her early trauma, using her needle, for most of her life.
L_Bourgeois_I am afraid

Kieran Stewart was our Context and Culture lecturer at VU and his enthusiasm for art is infectious.

He’s also a visual artist who works across the mediums of video, image making and sculptural installation. Kieran explores concepts of labour, systems of commercial promotion and gross capital production.

Kieran makes inflatable sculptures and his Occupy Nothing is a wall that deflates when someone approaches. The work re-inflates when is stops sensing movement. Kieran’s work often has a playful and unusual quality that I like.

Powered up and broken was a modified ATM placed in a gallery that printed the title and description of work on a receipt when you attempted to withdraw cash. This is one of Kieran’s favourite works and I love the craziness of it. More about Kieran here.

Flowers that bloom at midnight

In March I went to Brisbane Gallery Of Modern Art to see Yayoi Kusama’s exhibition, Look now, see forever.

In the show were large acrylic sculptures, installation rooms with inflatables, sculptures and mirrors, and large paintings, including an ‘Infinity Net’ series which inspired my Psychedelic Pink Coral painting. The Obliteration Room, an interactive work — a white room containing white furniture — was gradually covered with round colourful stickers by the audience. I love Yayoi Kusama’s work, it is so vibrant, quirky and colourful, and her installations are amazing. I first saw her work a few years back, her infinity room Soul under the moon, which is also at Brisbane GOMA. It’s incredible. You enter a small dark room and feel like you’re in a galaxy stretching to infinity. I’m so pleased I was able to see more of her work this year.

karenstarot

satnav for the soul

One Drawing Daily

I've been drawing and painting and learning (almost) every day since the 9th September 2014

MissstA

Your new favourite band

anastasia klose

contemporary artist in Sydney/Melbourne AUSTRALIA

Evangeline's Apple

A tale of knowledge and power

Scott's Blog

Senator Scott Ludlam's blog